Promoting Solomon Islands arts & crafts

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Wednesday, November 30 2016

To promote sales of Solomon Islands arts and crafts, PHAMA is funding work to educate tourists about what products they can take home.

Production of arts and crafts such as carvings, baskets, jewelry is an important livelihood for many villages and communities in Solomon Islands. The nation boasts some of the most beautiful arts and crafts in the region. Recent increases in cruise ship visits represent a potential new market for these local products. However, to date, sales have been limited, as tourists are uncertain about the quarantine rules for taking items back home to countries like Australia and New Zealand.

A film crew has been in Honiara this week to develop a short video to promote the rich, cultural diversity of Solomon Islands arts and crafts and the importance of sales for local communities. The video will also highlight common quarantine issues that tourists should be aware of when returning home, and identify which products can and can’t be taken home. The video will be available for use on cruise ships and, potentially, airlines serving the Solomon Islands.

“This video will greatly assist Solomon Islands producers like myself to provide information about our products, and encourage tourists to buy our art and crafts”, said Peter Maepioh, a local carver from Western Province who participated in the filming.

In addition to the video, PHAMA is developing an image catalogue of traditional Solomon Islands arts and crafts that will provide an explanation of the cultural significance of items, as well as indicating which materials may be of quarantine concern to Australian and New Zealand biosecurity authorities.

The catalogue and video will be finalised in early 2017, after which training will be provided by PHAMA to Solomon Islands authorities and artisans to inform them of quarantine issues related to arts and craft production. It is hoped that the catalogue, video and associated training will increase quarantine awareness of both artisans and tourists, thereby encouraging sales of arts and crafts to the increasing numbers of tourists visiting Solomon Islands.  

For further information, contact Andrew Piper at a.piper@phama.com.au or on +677 7495319
 
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